Book Tours: Starter Day Party The Immortal Seeds

I’m hosting the starter day party today for the book tour for family memoir “The Immortal Seeds”. The tour runs from June 28 to July 5. Check out the schedule below, and thanks for dropping by!

Tour Schedule

June 28th: Starter Day Party @ I Heart Reading

June 28th: Book Excerpt and Giveaway @ Mythical Books

June 30th: Promo Post @ Bookish Madness

July 1st: Book Review and Giveaway @ Books are Forever

July 1st: Promo Post @ T’s Stuff

July 2nd: Promo Post @ Author C.A. Milson’s Blog

July 3rd: Author Interview and Book Review @ Editor Charlene’s Blog

July 4th: Book Excerpt and Giveaway @ Nesie’s Place

July 5th: Book Review and Giveaway @ I Heart Reading

 
 

About the Book

Title: The Immortal Seeds: A Tribute to Golden Treasures

Author: Sambath Meas

Genre: Family Memoir

This is a story about a father’s dream of escaping a war-torn country in search of stability and freedom, so that his children can live and thrive.

Sarin Meas, who was born and grew up in a remote village in Trangel, Kampong Chhnang, drifts from one place to another in search of a purpose, and a better life. In Pailin, a small town in western Cambodia known for its richness of gemstones, he meets a poor and uneducated girl whose daily life, from dusk until dawn, is strained by hard work: selling fruits and vegetables at the local market, along with cooking, doing laundry and cleaning up after strangers and relatives whom her aunt has taken in. If she doesn’t do her chores correctly and one of them tells on her, her aunt, a woman whose mood changes like a person suffering from a split personality, hurls foul language at her and beats her with any heavy object in sight. Sarin realizes that this young woman, whom everyone calls Thach, will die if she continues to live like this. So he marries her out of compassion. His compassion turns into love. Sarin and Thach form a family.

Tragically, after fifteen years of peaceful existence and independence from France, Cambodia gets sucked into the war of idealism between the world’s super powers—America, China, and the Soviet Union—by way of the Vietnam War. Cambodian leaders and people take sides. The Khmer Republic (backed by the United States) and the Khmer Rouge (backed by China, the Soviet Union and Vietnam) fight each other acrimoniously. After five years of battle, the relentless Khmer Rouge soldiers emerge victorious. Sarin has an opportunity to escape to Thailand with his family, but chooses to remain behind out of fear of the unknown. Soon he realizes the victors don’t know how to manage the country. Fear, paranoia and revenge turn them and their supporters into a killing machine.  Sarin, through cleverness and luck, helps his family navigate the horror of communism. When a second opportunity arrives, like thousands of other surviving Cambodians, he takes the chance to venture to the unknown—to find freedom, opportunity, and a better life for his family.

The Immortal Seeds: A Tribute to Golden Treasures is not only about the continuing of a family’s life cycle; it is also about a father’s idea—a purpose—that gets passed on to his daughter. In turn she hopes to pass it on to people not only within her community but also around the world.

“King Grandfather would like to wish that your memoir The Immortal Seeds will become successful.”

—Norodom Sihanouk, King of Cambodia

The Immortal Seeds is a story of war, love, and the unbreakable bonds of family. Touchingly told, Sambath pays homage to her family across the generations, and shares how they helped the Meases to survive the war and thrive in peace.”

—Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father and Lucky Child

The Immortal Seeds exhibits a memoir’s emphasis on highly personalized, if not fully contextualized, experiences.”

—The Phnom Penh Post, Cambodia’s Newspaper

Author Bio

SAMBATH MEAS was born in Pailin, Cambodia at a time of civil war. Having survived the effects of the Vietnam War, the Khmer Civil War, and the Maoist-inspired Khmer Rouge regime, her parents decided not to stick around for another phase of mass killings. Her family, like thousands of other

Khmers, fled to the Cambodian-Thai border in 1979. After being displaced in refugee camps for two years, Chicago became their new home in 1981. Meas graduated from Loyola University of Chicago with a B.A. in political science and is taking writing classes at Northwestern University. She has worked in the legal industry for over 19 years and contributes to the richness that is Chicago literature. In her spare time, she helps novice writers to get started with their stories. Her current projects include self-help, science fiction, graphic novel, and young adult fantasy books. She writes fiction, focusing on murder mystery, fantasy, and science fiction; and nonfiction, focusing on memoir, biography, and self-improvement.

You can follow the author at the following sites:

Website: www.sambathmeas.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/sambathmeas1

Twitter: @MissSambathMeas

Instagram: smeasuniverse

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Book Tours: Author Interview The Red Hand of Fury

How long have you been writing?

I’ve been writing stories since I learnt how to read and write in primary school. Most people grow out of it. I just carried on. I’ve been a published author since 2006, but I was writing seriously before that for decades. I sold some stories to women’s magazines in the UK when I was still a student, so that would have been back in say *coughs in embarrassment* 1980 or 1981. Those were my first paid publications.

What is your favorite genre to write?

I think it must be historical crime, or mystery, seeing as nearly all the books I’ve written are in that genre. I love the idea of working out an intricate plot and then building a rich, textured world for it to come to life in. There’s no doubt that it’s a challenge because there’s so much research involved and then you have to make the imaginative leap to bring it all to life. In some ways you have to put the research to one side, and hope that the important things have soaked into you by osmosis.

Which genre have you never tried before, but would you like to try out?

My next novel is a dystopian novel set in the future and it’s my first time writing something like that. But that doesn’t really answer your question! Maybe a ghost story, or a contemporary crime novel, or maybe something with a touch of fantasy in it. I like genres where the imagination has free rein. And also I do tend towards the darker edges of the spectrum, I’m afraid.

Please tell us about your book.

The book is a historical mystery called The Red Hand of Fury. It’s set in London in 1914, just on the eve of the First World War. Actually, war breaks out towards the end of the book. A series of sinister deaths occur, apparently suicides, but there are certain things linking the deaths. Silas Quinn is the head of the Special Crimes Department in New Scotland Yard and he sets out to investigate these deaths, but the investigation takes him back into the darkest chapter of his own personal life. I’m trying not to give away any spoilers!

Which character was your favorite, and why? Which character was your least favorite, and why?

I would have to say Silas Quinn, the main character, because he’s so complex and messed up. I’m also very fond of his two sidekicks, Detective Sergeants Inchball and Macadam. Inchball is very blunt and straight-talking. Macadam is a self-taught expert on all sorts of things. But they are both fiercely loyal to Quinn. My least favourite? I think there are probably quite a few contenders for that honour but there’s a colleague of Quinn’s called DCI Coddington who crops up towards the end of the book. He’s an idiot basically, but he has no self-awareness and thinks he’s really smart.

What was the hardest part about writing your book?

The hardest part of writing any book is just sitting down in front of that computer every day – or every opportunity you have – and making sure you put some words down. Keeping going I suppose. There are times when you think the story’s coming apart, or where you’re not sure you have the skills to do justice to the idea, or where you reach a scene that you know is going to be particular hard to write, because it’s a crucial scene, or one full of emotion and you have to somehow make sure it has energy and comes to life. You don’t know, in advance, how you’re going to do it. But somehow you do.

What is your writing routine? Are there things you absolutely need to start writing?

My only full writing day is Monday, as I have a day job that keeps me busy four days a week. I also try to get some writing done at the weekends, but there are generally other things to do, so I have to fit my writing around whatever else I have to do. (Chores!) On a Monday, I like to be at my desk by no later than 9.00 am with a full pot of black coffee. These days I drink decaffeinated because I was having trouble sleeping, I think because I was drinking too much coffee over the week. On a Monday I will aim to write at least 2,000 words, though I won’t stop at that if it’s going well. 2,500 is a good day. Any more than that is a gift. I work up until 1pm then stop to eat something and listen to the news on the radio. By 2pm I should be back at my desk. No coffee now, but tea. So it’s really just a case of powering through until I’ve reached my target. I find it’s good to break off mid chapter or mid-scene so I have something to come back to the next time, but that doesn’t always happen. At weekends, I just sneak away to my desk and work when I can. We have a room in the house that is my office. It’s pretty messy at the moment – it always gets messy when I’m in the middle of a book, then I tidy it up before I start the next one.

How long did it take you to write your book from start to finish?

I had a year to write it in. That was my deadline from the publisher but I seem to think it took me a little less than that. I think I delivered about a month or so early.

Can you tell us about your editing process?

Once I’ve finished the first draft I export it to a mobi document that I can read on my kindle. Then I read it through highlighting any passages that I think need reworking or that I can cut. I invariably over-write in the first draft and that cutting process really helps to tighten the story. Then the book goes to my editor. With this one, my commissioning editor was happy with the manuscript as it was – that’s to say she had no structural edits – so she passed it to the copy editor, who marked it up for any line edits or queries that she had. That tends to be a negotiation, because sometimes as a writer you have things which are true to your voice but may not be strictly grammatical. After the copy editor, it’s passed to a proofreader whose job it is is to catch any final snags.

Is this book part of a series? If so, how many installments do you have planned?

That’s a good question! I’m writing the next book now, and have story outlines for three more after that. Whether I will end up writing them all, I don’t know.

Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?

Keep at it. Perseverance pays off, or it did in my case. I would also say, read widely, and read actively. By that I mean, always have an eye open for what the writer is up to. You can learn from reading bad books as well as good books – or maybe it’s better to say from books that you don’t like as well as ones you do, because then you can work out what didn’t work for you. That’s as important as what does. Develop your own taste. From that will come your own voice – and that’s the thing that publishers are looking for.

Why should everyone read your book?

That’s a difficult question! I wouldn’t be so presumptuous as to say everyone should… But if you like twisty, dark, thought-provoking historical noir, then maybe this is the book for you! I think it’s a fascinating period too, the beginning of the twentieth century. In some ways a time of innocence and promise, when there were so many scientific developments and revolutions in art and politics. An exciting time to be alive. But we know with hindsight that there were terrible catastrophes to come. I think that sense of perspective that the reader has may add to the experience of reading it, adding a certain depth and extra darkness.

If you could meet three authors, dead or alive, which authors would you choose?

Fyodor Dostoevsky, although he might not be very happy to meet me as I wrote four novels featuring a character from one of his novels (Porfiry Petrovich from Crime and Punishment); I would like to meet Agatha Christie to ask her where she got to when she disappeared that time and to see what she thinks of all the film and TV adaptations of her books; and HG Wells, who wrote some amazing stories of course, but more importantly I based a character in The Red Hand of Fury very loosely on him, so I would like to see whether I came anywhere close – and also to ask him about the period because it would help enormously with the research for my next book.

What inspired you to write your book?

A fascination with that period of history and with the darker side of human nature.

Are you working on something at the moment? If so, can you tell us more about it? As I mentioned above, I’m working on the next in my Silas Quinn series. This one is actually set during the first months of the war. More than that, I cannot say!

 

The Red Hand of Fury

London, June 1914. A young man is mauled to death at London Zoo after deliberately climbing into the bear pit. Shortly afterwards, another young man leaps to his death from the notorious Suicide Bridge. Two seemingly unconnected deaths – and yet there are similarities.

Following a third attempted suicide, Detective Inspector Silas Quinn knows he must uncover the link between the three men if he is to discover what caused them to take their own lives. The one tangible piece of evidence is a card found in each of the victims’ possession, depicting a crudely-drawn red hand. What does it signify? To find the answers, Quinn must revisit his own dark past. But can he keep his sanity in the process …?

Links

Amazon (UK)

Amazon (US)

 

Author Bio

R. N. Morris is the author of eight historical crime novels. His first, A Gentle Axe, was published by Faber and Faber in 2007. Set in St Petersburg in the nineteenth century, it features Porfiry Petrovich, the investigating magistrate from Dostoevsky’s great novel, Crime and Punishment. The book was published in many countries, including Russia. He followed that up with A Vengeful Longing, which was shortlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger. A Razor Wrapped in Silk came next, followed by The Cleansing Flames, which was nominated for the Ellis Peters Historical Novel Dagger. The Silas Quinn series of novels, set in London in 1914, began with Summon Up The Blood, followed by The Mannequin HouseThe Dark Palace and now The Red Hand of Fury, published on 31 March, 2018.

Taking Comfort is a standalone contemporary novel, written as Roger Morris. He also wrote the libretto to the opera When The Flame Dies, composed by Ed Hughes.

 

Links

Twitter: @rnmorris

Facebook Page Red Hand of Fury

Website: rogernmorris.co.uk

Giveaway

Win a hardback copy of The Red Hand of Fury (Open Internationally)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

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Author Interview Her Name is Mercie by Chris Roy

How long have you been writing?

By Hook or Crook is a collection of short stories I penned from 2007 – 2010, my first works of crime fiction a friend and I self-published in 2012. One day I was talking with some friends – all of us on High Risk for escaping – about writing a book, the possibilities of it. Making enough money to buy our freedom. I just sat on my bed and began creating these two criminals, Razor and Blondie, and placed them in situations based on personal experiences, and even fabricated jobs from crimes I had read about or learned from other criminals in here. The hamdwritten stories were read by a handful of guys on High Risk and Death Row. Guys that have been, incarcerated for decades, read hundreds of books, and had no fear of pointing and laughing at a fellow convict. But they didn’t laugh. They liked the criminal ventures of Razor and Blondie. I’ve been studying the craft of fiction writing since.

  • What is your favorite genre to write?

Crime fiction. Creating criminal characters, a duo or team, with particular skills that, combined, can accomplish an impossible, illegal feat for the good of other people or even a community – that gives me exquisite pleasure.

  • Which genre have you never tried before, but would you like to try out?

Those who know my works of crime and dark fiction will likely not believe this. And my ex girlfriends and wife will probably burst out laughing (and pointing). I’ll tell you anyway: romance. It would have action, some dark plotting, though the primary subject in the storyline would be the relationship of a man and woman. I actually have an outline scribbled out. It’s terrible. It’s intimidating.

  • Please tell us about your book.

Her Name Is Mercie is a noir feature in a collection of short stories. Mercie is a college educated gas station attendant that lives with her parents in a small town in South Mississippi. In general she is content, has no ambition to become Someone, even if knowing her life has little meaning. Then her parents are shot to death by police officers during a traffic stop, and she discovers meaning through loss. Possessing no skills to take action she does anyhow, and finds the people responsible for her folks’ deaths are not innocent, they were not only doing their jobs – they were doing something else under the guise of legitimacy. Mercie loses control after the discovery.

  • Which character was your favorite, and why? Which character was your least favorite, and why?

The protagonist, Mercie, was initially based on someone I know and love. She did not care for the story. So I changed Mercie’s character and the events of the story. I made it darker. At that point the antagonists were in my head all the time, the main one for sure. Which is became my new focus, my new favorite, the orchestrator. A sneaky, unsuspecting one. Very innocent in appearance. Very deadly in reality. My least favorite? One of the police officers was, at points, hard to write. To get my thoughts aligned with. Sick dude.

  • What was the hardest part about writing your book?

Finishing it! The publisher loved Mercie and two other short stories I submitted, though wanted more to flesh out a book. I was given a deadline. My first one. I had to write Libby’s Hands and Hunger with that looming. I was feeling it, the time constraint. Felt the carrot dangling and the stick prodding. And did some good work, I think, for it.

  • What is your writing routine? Are there things you absolutely need to start writing?

I jot down ideas on paper. Sometimes it’s just a title and that takes shape into an event with a story surrounding it. Sometimes banter with other convicts seeds a story idea, and I’ll scratch out notes. I always write a first draft by hand, then type it on a phone. Google Docs are the center of my little world these days.

  • How long did it take you to write your book from start to finish?

There are five stories in Her Name Is Mercie. The first two were done in about a month during the 2016 holiday season. Mercie is longer and was done in bursts spaced out for about a year – I was attempting to market my crime thriller trilogies published with New Pulp Press and started a few other dark fiction projects. I completed the book Mercie in February 2018.

  • Can you tell us about your editing process?

It’s difficult to stay in Create mode and get the entire story out before Edit mode kicks in. I’ll write between one to five pages then go back through it. I’ll move on once I’m satisfied. Periodically I’ll read what I have of the story and make adjustments, get new ideas, scratch out others. When the story is done I proof it numerous times and ask family and friends to test drive it, hit me between the eyes with their opinions.

  • Is this book part of a series? If so, how many installments do you have planned?

I don’t know… I do know I would be grateful if anyone reads it and likes it so much they demand more works with the same characters. You know, the ones still, alive.

  • Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?

I started writing because I need money for a lawyer. I wrote for all these years and have three publishing contracts. So far I’ve received one royalty check. It wasn’t enough to retain an attorney. It was enough to get some Nutty Bars and Ramen noodles.

Just because you get published does not mean you will make money. Most books don’t get published. A small percentage of published works make sales – the competition is vast and the books selling have money behind them, usually because the authors are very marketable and have cash to throw around. You can have a spectacular book on the market, on Amazon, etc… and no one knows it’s there.

To new authors, be prepared for this. If you are seeking status, it could be a long journey with nothing but disappointment. If you are a true Writer, then fulfillment through passion is yours to enjoy every single day.

  • Why should everyone read your book?

There’s something for everyone. Thrills, chills, kills, action and humor. The characters are varied and engaging. The plots are jabs in the face with an unseen tickle. My best works, this collection.

  • If you could meet three authors, dead or alive, which authors would you choose?

Elmore Leonard. I just finished all the seasons of Justified and have found myself daydreaming about talking to that guy, mostly listening. He’s the kind of person I would shut up and listen to.

Elka Ray – have you read her psychological suspense novel Saigon Dark? High impact crime fiction. She’s a serious writer, and I believe she’s going places.

Greg Barth. I was on his show Noir on the Radio in 2017 to talk about Shocking Circumstances, a thriller I wrote in first-person female. Very difficult. Greg wrote Selena, a successful violent, sexual noir series in first-person female. After the show he sent me books 1 and 2. They are very good. I saw similarities, and got ideas that made me want to rewrite mine, after some research and further character studies.

  • What inspired you to write your book?

I still need a lawyer…

  • Are you working on something at the moment? If so, can you tell us more about it?

Waste Management is up next. Not sure of the publication date, maybe next year. It’s very dark. I’ll let it speak for itself. Here’s an excerpt:

She refused to open her mouth.

The man’s head tilted, nostrils puffing. He shook an aerosol can, squinting. Rocks popped under boots darkened and creased with use, threads stretching. He sprang into a turn, legs like columns of stone thudding oversized Red Wings across the service drive to the waste management truck.

The utility box opened, gloved hand slipped in and retrieved an item. The compartment clicked shut. He returned to the girl.

Fright – pure and intense – pushed out her stare as he approached. He stopped close enough that she felt his breath, a foul, hot gas shrouding the cold tears on her cheeks. He held up a red straw and inserted it into the can without error. In a blink his leather palm rammed into her forehead, immobilizing her face. Vision swimming, she could no longer see him. She held her breath as the pressure of his increased, eyelids squeezed tight. She felt the straw enter, slide into her throat.

He pulled it out.

Her scream was muffled by industrial grade adhesive, dull yellow bubbles of foam glue roiling from lips working to eject it.

The man stood back. Slipped the can in a pocket of his coveralls. Light gathered on his irises, wicked pulse matching his puffing nose. He caressed her throat, thumb rubbing over the spiking carotids.

Her back rose sharply, locking into a stiff arch. Eyes stuck wide. The moment passed with his nostrils flared. A tremble passed over his skin. He squeezed, hard.

Blink.

 His hand relaxed. The other clenched into a fist. A single blow to her chest made her pulse return. Her eyes closed.

He tore her loose and dropped her on the pavement next to a storm drain. The backs of her hands stuck to the service exit, foam blooming from pink skin like an exotic display at a high end art gallery.

From a sheath strapped to his leg he pulled a long pry bar. Opened the storm drain and looked in. The walls of the new office complex took on a hollow rush of water. He tapped the pry bar on the thick iron lid next to his boot. Straightened, pivoted to assess the infected target.

The girl folded her arms, violent shaking commandeering the muscles in her jaw, shoulders and legs. Hair plastered to one cheek, it matched the tones in the foam mounded on her lips, now hardened.

He struck her. The pry bar bit deep into her pelvis, shattering it. Her eyes shot open. The alley hummed with anguish, her throat swelling. He dropped the tool. The steel rang inches from her ear. Core consumed by fire of mortal trauma, her obscured awareness turned completely black. The man loomed, a mountain of darkness, boots creaking on the sides of her ruined hips.

Mucus sprayed as he sat down, can of adhesive once more in hand. He inspected the straw. Slid it deep into her nose and sprayed. His nostrils puffed in sync with the arteries in her neck, bulging under his thumb.

The violent shaking in her limbs became thrashing, spine jerking side to side. Her hands, dwarfed by his gloved grip, pushed at the can. Limited edition peep toes dug for purchase on the wet pavement behind him, heels grinding down.

Pry bar in hand, standing, he tossed the can into the drain. Then struck her again. Like a boxer finishing a punch drill, fists thundering into a heavy bag, the man battered her hips. Before she suffocated, her heart failed again. The rain of steel continued, eating away the joints.

His eyes moved to her shoulders. His arms adjusted, freakish mass swinging the tool hard. The roof above turned a deep violet, dusk passing into night.

The pace of the strikes never slowed. Slight turn of his boots, and he pounded away at her neck. He stopped as if completing a precise count. Sheathed his tool and stomped down on her chest. Gloved hands wound through her long hair and pulled up. Skin elongated. Snatch, cartilage, vertebrae crackling. Tossed it into the drain. Grabbed an arm.

Limbs washed away, he kicked the torso. Log rolled it over to the runoff of Spring rain. Picked it up, squishing, her bloody clothes rubbing on him, adding to the spatter layered up and down his old coveralls. Turning her vertical, he dropped the corpse into the drain.

***

From the wall next to the service exit, another girl watched. The tips of her fingers picked at the hard glue that bound her to the faux granite. Her lips wrinkled and spasmed, instinct fighting the poisonous invasion adhering to the soft tissue of her mouth and throat.

She kept looking to her right. A glob of hard foam mounted her head to the wall, though if she strained she could glimpse the door knob; she knew, any moment now, the manager would step out for a smoke and…

Save me! Oh my motherfuck, save me! Sasha… what just happened to Sasha? Oh my fucking Jesus!  

Her eyes darted left. Rolled back as searing pain ripped up her arms, down her back. The man sacked her over a shoulder and looked around. He blurred into a fast walk.

The girl’s legs flopped against him, urine running off her heels, squiggly patterns darkening the pavement behind the truck.

About the Book

Title: Her Name is Mercie

Author: Chris Roy

Genre: Thriller, Noir, Horror

Purchase: Amazon

Roy delivers on the edge of your seat storytelling with rough edges, crooked cops and a tiny light at the end of the tunnel that is never quite extinguished.
Tom Vater, co–founder of Crime Wave Press.
Her Name Is Mercie is a fast furious ride into an inferno of the highest tension you are likely to encounter this year. Where noir meets thriller, toss a coin. Dive in. And unplug your phones, pcs tablets and keep reading deeper and deeper, until the final pages.
Richard Godwin, author of Apostle Rising.
Mercie Hillbrook lives a simple, quiet life working as a gas station attendant. Then her parents are killed. Her home is taken. The people responsible are excused for just doing their job. When an attempt to get justice her way lands her in trouble with the law, Mercie realizes she still has something to lose: her own life.
Then she finds reason to believe her parents were murdered… and she doesn’t care anymore

Book Tours: Promo Post for Wolf Boy

Peragrim was his name. An inhuman human sworn to destroy his quarry, three human children – Connor, Evey and Billy. They had been transported to a world ruled by the Wolf People, but Peragrim was waiting for them

Purchase Links

Amazon USA: https://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Boy-G-D-Sammon-ebook/dp/B06XDDNTRF/

Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wolf-Boy-G-D-Sammon/dp/1612968260/

Amazon Australia: https://www.amazon.com.au/Wolf-Boy-G-D-Sammon-ebook/dp/B06XDDNTRF/

Amazon Canada: https://www.amazon.ca/Wolf-Boy-G-D-Sammon-ebook/dp/B06XDDNTRF/

Black Rose Writing: http://www.blackrosewriting.com/childrens-booksya/wolfboy?rq=Wolf%20Boy

Barnes and Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/wolf-boy-gd-sammon/1125548996?ean=9781612968261

Blackwell’s: https://blackwells.co.uk/bookshop/product/Wolf-Boy-by-G-D-Sammon/9781612968261

Author Bio

Gerry Sammon is a journalist and former newspaper editor based in Bolton, Lancashire.

From September 2015 he has been a tutor in Media Law at News Associates in Manchester, an award-winning private training provider, tutoring trainee journalists in media law and ethics. He also teaches media law to students at Manchester Metropolitan University, and at the University of Central Lancashire based in Preston.

He has travelled widely, both for business and on family holidays.

The idea for Wolf Boy came from a dream my daughters used to have when they were small children. The elder daughter would dream there was a wolf in the wardrobe (this is how our adventure begins in Wolf Boy), and my youngest daughter had a dream that a crocodile lived under her bed.

Gerry is married, with two grown-up daughters

Social Media Links

Twitter @GerrySammon

Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/GerrySammon.author/

WordPress author blog: https://gerrysammon.wordpress.com/

Giveaway

Win 6 x copies of Wolf Boy in Paperback (Open Internationally)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter box below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then I reserve the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time I will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

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Release Blitz Oak Seer

About Oak Seer

Thrust into the public eye as the “Green Lady,” Effie of Glen Coe has become a living legend, the fey woman who saved Scotland from devastation. But to some, she’s a threat to human existence and a traitor to fey-kind.

Determined more than ever to forge a peace between fey and humans, Effie finds herself navigating a realm increasingly divided. The lords of London have other plans, and once again Effie is pulled into a quagmire of politics and greed. She must stand against plots to remove her kind from the shores of the empire and madmen who murder fey without regard.

Even worse, heinous cults have arisen, enthralled by an unseen enemy. With violent thugs and unruly mobs all around, wits and courage are not enough. Effie must become something more than herself, an Oak Seer, a fey mantle long lost. But can she survive long enough to claim it?

Author Bio

Craig Comer is the author of the gaslamp fantasy series A FEY MATTER, which includes THE LAIRD OF DUNCAIRN and OAK SEER. He is a co-author of the mosaic fantasy novel THE ROADS TO BALDAIRN MOTTE. Craig earned a Master’s Degree in Writing from the University of Southern California and enjoys tramping across countries in his spare time, preferably those strewn with pubs and castles. His website is: https://craigcomer.com/

Links

https://craigcomer.com/

Get your copy on Amazon

An excerpt from Oak Seer – Chapter One

            Heavy spring rains flooded the road to Langmire. The village sprouted to the north of Stirling along the River Teith. It smelled old to Effie, full of moldy timbers, damp leaves, and rusting iron. The collection of buildings, crofters’ homes mostly, sagged like the slumped back of a crone. Grey smoke wafted from a few blackened chimneys that sprouted from thatched roofs. Someone baked fresh bread. She caught it on the wind, and another something sweeter. Eager for a warm hearth and a cup of honeyed tea, she licked her parched lips. She’d travelled a full day to reach the village. She’d come because Conall Murray had begged her, because without her an innocent woman would hang.

            In the heart of the village grew a stout oak. Muckle Ben the locals called it, Effie had once heard. They’d carved a Green Man into its bark long ago, during a time when such things held power. Now banners pronouncing some celebration hung from its limbs more often than not, but none remained there currently. Its trunk stood as somber as an undertaker. Chickens picked at worms in the upturned soil near its roots, and a lone hound howled at the rustling leaves as the branches creaked above.

            Fergus Alpin hacked into his handkerchief, a wet, miserable noise she’d had to contend with the entire journey from Stirling. The Fey Finder sat across from her in the steam carriage’s tight compartment. His wrinkled face was spotted and thin, and he kept tugging his coat tighter about his frail bones. She tried to avoid his gaze, but nothing adorned the compartment for her to study, and she could only stare out the window for so long before feeling rude.

            “I’ll do the speaking,” the man said. “You will remain silent.” The quiver at his lip turned into another fit of hacking, yet she still heard his mumbling. “Send a fey to catch a fey, and one with paps at that!”

            The steam carriage rocked and bounced, splashing through the flooded road as if fording a stony riverbed. Its benches were worn and hard, the padding flattened from years of service. A lightly stained wood paneling formed its walls, floor, and roof. The boiler at the rear of the carriage warmed the compartment, but at the expense of the coal smoke that clouded the air.

Effie shifted to relieve her sore hips. Her eyes narrowed. “The Fey Finder General bade me accompany you, Mr. Alpin, and not so I would stand and do nothing.” She tried to keep the bite from her tongue. Of Fey Finders, Alpin was a journeyman and not a zealot. At least there was that. He sought not to be bothered rather than possessing the fiery hatred common to his profession.

She pressed her palms into the cushion on either side of her, to steady herself. It still marveled her she could sit so close to a Sniffer, a man the crown tasked with hunting down malevolent fey. Malevolent, as if they knew what the word meant. They hunted all with fey blood, and as a Sithling—one with the ancient blood of the Daoine Sith coursing through her—that included her. But things had changed after Caldwell House, and she had a need to trust where once she dared not. The fierce battle there had forced the lords of the empire to open their eyes. They could not rest on centuries of intolerance any longer. They had to welcome the fey into society’s ranks and accept a permanent treaty. They had witnessed the fate awaiting them if they did not.

Effie’s heart warmed. If the lords of the empire could learn to trust, so could she, and perhaps the Scottish fey would live freely for the first time in millennia.

            Alpin’s jaw worked. He’d likely never had someone with paps stand up to him. Most Scots of either gender avoided Sniffers as if they carried the plague. “Look here, Miss Effie,” he snapped. “I’ll not have it. You may dine with the likes of lords, but you’re not in some grand procession here. I know the hearts of these gentle folk better than you ever will, and I will not banter with the mind of a devious hag.”

            “When you see one, I’m sure,” said Effie, not knowing whether the man had meant her or the poor Spae Wife they’d come to question.

            Heavy spring rains flooded the road to Langmire. The village sprouted to the north of Stirling along the River Teith. It smelled old to Effie, full of moldy timbers, damp leaves, and rusting iron. The collection of buildings, crofters’ homes mostly, sagged like the slumped back of a crone. Grey smoke wafted from a few blackened chimneys that sprouted from thatched roofs. Someone baked fresh bread. She caught it on the wind, and another something sweeter. Eager for a warm hearth and a cup of honeyed tea, she licked her parched lips. She’d travelled a full day to reach the village. She’d come because Conall Murray had begged her, because without her an innocent woman would hang.

            In the heart of the village grew a stout oak. Muckle Ben the locals called it, Effie had once heard. They’d carved a Green Man into its bark long ago, during a time when such things held power. Now banners pronouncing some celebration hung from its limbs more often than not, but none remained there currently. Its trunk stood as somber as an undertaker. Chickens picked at worms in the upturned soil near its roots, and a lone hound howled at the rustling leaves as the branches creaked above.

            Fergus Alpin hacked into his handkerchief, a wet, miserable noise she’d had to contend with the entire journey from Stirling. The Fey Finder sat across from her in the steam carriage’s tight compartment. His wrinkled face was spotted and thin, and he kept tugging his coat tighter about his frail bones. She tried to avoid his gaze, but nothing adorned the compartment for her to study, and she could only stare out the window for so long before feeling rude.

            “I’ll do the speaking,” the man said. “You will remain silent.” The quiver at his lip turned into another fit of hacking, yet she still heard his mumbling. “Send a fey to catch a fey, and one with paps at that!”

            The steam carriage rocked and bounced, splashing through the flooded road as if fording a stony riverbed. Its benches were worn and hard, the padding flattened from years of service. A lightly stained wood paneling formed its walls, floor, and roof. The boiler at the rear of the carriage warmed the compartment, but at the expense of the coal smoke that clouded the air.

Effie shifted to relieve her sore hips. Her eyes narrowed. “The Fey Finder General bade me accompany you, Mr. Alpin, and not so I would stand and do nothing.” She tried to keep the bite from her tongue. Of Fey Finders, Alpin was a journeyman and not a zealot. At least there was that. He sought not to be bothered rather than possessing the fiery hatred common to his profession.

She pressed her palms into the cushion on either side of her, to steady herself. It still marveled her she could sit so close to a Sniffer, a man the crown tasked with hunting down malevolent fey. Malevolent, as if they knew what the word meant. They hunted all with fey blood, and as a Sithling—one with the ancient blood of the Daoine Sith coursing through her—that included her. But things had changed after Caldwell House, and she had a need to trust where once she dared not. The fierce battle there had forced the lords of the empire to open their eyes. They could not rest on centuries of intolerance any longer. They had to welcome the fey into society’s ranks and accept a permanent treaty. They had witnessed the fate awaiting them if they did not.

Effie’s heart warmed. If the lords of the empire could learn to trust, so could she, and perhaps the Scottish fey would live freely for the first time in millennia.

            Alpin’s jaw worked. He’d likely never had someone with paps stand up to him. Most Scots of either gender avoided Sniffers as if they carried the plague. “Look here, Miss Effie,” he snapped. “I’ll not have it. You may dine with the likes of lords, but you’re not in some grand procession here. I know the hearts of these gentle folk better than you ever will, and I will not banter with the mind of a devious hag.”

            “When you see one, I’m sure,” said Effie, not knowing whether the man had meant her or the poor Spae Wife they’d come to question.

Book Tours: Starter Day Party Everything Under The Sun

I’m hosting the starter day party today for the tour for YA/NA Crossover/Dystopian “Everything Under The Sun”. The tour runs from Juhne 20 to July 3.

Tour Schedule

June 20th: Starter Day Party @ I Heart Reading

June 22nd: Book Excerpt and Giveaway @ Inspired Chaos

June 23rd: Promo Post @ Nesie’s Place

June 24th: Author Interview @ The Single Librarian

June 25th: Promo Post @ Laura’s Interests

June 26th: Promo Post and Giveaway @ Bedazzled Reading

June 26th: Author Interview and Giveaway @ Majanka’s Blog

June 27th: Book Excerpt @ T’s Stuff

June 28th: Author Interview @ Cassidy Crimson’s Blog

June 29th: Book Review @ Double Decker Books

June 30th: Book Excerpt @ Nesie’s Place

June 30th: Book Excerpt @ Books are Forever

July 1st: Book Review and Giveaway @ I Heart Reading

July 1st: Promo Post @ Indy Book Fairy

July 2nd: Book Excerpt @ Bookish Madness

July 3rd: Author Interview @ Editor Charlene’s Blog

July 3rd: Book Review @ Simply Kelina

About the Book

Title: Everything Under The Sun

Author: Jessica Redmerski

Genre: YA/NA Crossover; Dystopian

Thais Fenwick was eleven-years-old when civilization fell, devastated by a virus that killed off the majority of the world’s population. For seven years, Thais and her family lived in a community of survivors deep in the heart of the Appalachian Mountains. But when her town is attacked by raiders, she and her blind sister are taken away to the East-Central Territory where she is destined to live the cruel and unjust kind of life her late mother warned her about.

Atticus Hunt is a troubled soldier in Lexington City who has spent the past seven years trying to conform to the vicious nature of men in a post-apocalyptic society. He knows that in order to survive, he must abandon his morals and his conscience and become like those he is surrounded by. But when he meets Thais, morals and conscience win out over conformity, and he risks his rank and his life to help her. They escape the city and set out together on a long and perilous journey to find safety in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Struggling to survive in a world without electricity, food, shelter, and clean water, Atticus and Thais shed their fear of growing too close, and they fall hopelessly in love. But can love survive in such dark times, or is it fated to die with them?

Author Bio

Jessica Redmerski is a New York Times, USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestselling author, international bestseller, and award winner, who juggles several different genres. She began self-publishing in 2012, and later with the success of THE EDGE OF NEVER, signed on with Grand Central Publishing/Forever Romance. Her works have been translated into more than twenty languages.

Jessica is a hybrid author who, in addition to working with a traditional publisher, also continues to self-publish. Her popular crime and suspense series, In the Company of Killers, has been optioned for television and film by actor and model William Levy.

She also writes as J.A. Redmerski.

Links

Website

Twitter

Goodreads

Facebook

Buy from Amazon (eBook)

Buy from Amazon (Paperback)

Book Tours: Book Spotlight The Hanging Women

A historical crime thriller set in 1886 Chicago; the power house of America, a sink of corruption and vice which is haunted by riots and gangland killings.  A story of weak men and strong women.

Jack Stevens discovers the bodies of two women, Philomena Blackstaff and Mary Walsh, tied together and hung by their ankles in a position resembling the symbol for treachery as depicted on tarot cards. Though retired and now wealthy, Stevens is an ex-sheriff and involves himself in the subsequent investigation.

As a result of Jack `stealing’ Philomena’s diary and his association with the Pinkerton detective agency, it is discovered that Mary Walsh worked undercover for the Pinkertons, investigating the Knights of Labour (the fastest growing workers’ rights movements in America of the late 1800’s). The women had been working together, tracing the man who was selling guns and dynamite to the more extremest factions of the workers movement. This led them to Ruby’s, a secret `nightclub for deviants’, where Stevens and Inspector O’Leary believe the pair fell foul of the man they were looking for, gang leader Joseph Mannheim.

With the May 4th Haymarket riots and bombings looming, Stevens must uncover the truth about The Hanging Women before it’s too late.

Purchase Linkhttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Hanging-Women-John-Mead/dp/1912362058

Author Bio

John was born in the mid-fifties in Dagenham, London, on part of the largest council estate ever built, and was the first pupil from his local secondary modern school to attend university. He has now taken early retirement to write, having spent the first part of his life working in education and the public sector. He was the director of a college, a senior school inspector for a local authority, and was head of a unit for young people with physical and mental health needs. When he is not travelling, going to the theatre or the pub, he writes.
His inspiration for his debut novel came whilst attending a lecture in Denver about the history of the American midwest, describing a time and place that was very different from that espoused by popular culture, which started him thinking this would make a excellent period in which to set a crime story.
His book describes how Chicago was a prototype of much that we consider both good and bad in the current age, it had a vibrancy and decadence that allowed a few enterprising individuals to prosper whilst violence and intolerance held back many others. The situation for some African Americans and women was improving but it was still a time when to be anything other than white and male made you a second class citizen.  The city was the manufacturing and transport hub of America, the vast influx of immigrants swelling its already booming population brought great wealth but also corruption and criminality. The midwest and Chicago typified a way of life, the ‘gun culture’ which is a euphemism for individualism, from which much of modern American social values have grown.

John is currently working on a trilogy of novels set in modern day London. These police procedurals examine the darker side of modern life in the East End of the city: a Whitechapel noir.

 

Social Media Links

Twitter

Goodreads

Amazon

 

Author Interview The Checkered War

  • How long have you been writing?

I wrote my first short story while I was in elementary school. When I went to college, I thought I had to do something more noble, like go to medical school or law school. Every time I changed my major I changed it back to English and creative writing. Seven times! I have been writing ever since in various disciplines such as adult fiction novels, illustrated novelettes, biographies, short stories, and screenplays. The Checkered War is the debut of my first book for children.

  • What is your favorite genre to write?

I love to write suspense and thrillers, peppered with a dose of drama, and always humor.

  • Which genre have you never tried before, but would you like to try out?

I’d like to write a historical fiction novel, where I get to make up the story, but all of the historical facts are accurate and true. This of course entails research research research!

  • Please tell us about your book.

The Checkered War is about a feud that is raging between three colonies. Although they had been fighting since the beginning of last summer, this summer, this particular battle, will secure a lasting victory. The Harvesters live near the paved road beside a large and spacious wheat field. Their rival, the Carpenters, live west of where the road splits into a bumpy and dusty path leading into the abandoned forest. And the Blood Red Slave Hunters live wherever they please. Everyone is afraid of them. This is the story of war and feast, and … no not famine… more feast!

And of Willy, our unlikely hero who has been adopted by the Harvesters. He is from the Black-Haired Garden colony and is nothing like them. Small and young, he knows nothing of war. How can he possibly help prepare for the big battle?

Willy learns that some species are parasites who never work, wandering around feeding off other colonies. Others are thieves and robbers, or killers and cannibals. And it’s always about war.

Does Willy merely try to survive, or does he figure out how to be a useful member of the colony? Can an insignificant like Willy help to win an unstoppable war?

  • Which character was your favorite, and why? Which character was your least favorite, and why?

I love Willy because he is faced with enormous challenges, yet never gives up. I admire Ada because although she lacks self-confidence, she is dependable and will do whatever is required. I like Twiggy because she is energetic, corny and funny. And I like Queen Opal because although she is stern and disciplined, she is fair, and wants nothing more than to protect her colony. My least favorite is Queen Dimona because she is vicious and unrelenting in her ability to hurt others.

  • What was the hardest part about writing your book?

The Ant Facts. I wanted them to be correct and precise, so I did an enormous amount of research, reading several books, including a 732-page encyclopedia-like scientific volume entitled The Ants.

  • What is your writing routine? Are there things you absolutely need to start writing?

I write every day for four to six hours. I spend the rest of the day plotting and planning, making outlines, and most of all researching needed information to make sure what I am writing is correct. I make very detailed outlines, carefully plotting the introduction to the characters, the inciting incident, and each turning point. I know the ending before I start writing, and write from start to finish to get there.

  • How long did it take you to write your book from start to finish?

The Checkered War took me one year to write. Half of that time was spent on the illustrations. I knew what I wanted them to look like, but I knew nothing about the art of air brushing. So I bought a couple of books and started practicing until I got the nine illustrations right.

  • Can you tell us about your editing process?

The editing process is a bottomless pit. For most authors, we can nit-pick each sentence and every word, changing some minute detail constantly. I do this to some degree, and I usually edit my book 20 or 30 times. At some point I have to realize that changing one more word is not going to change the story, so I say, “Okay, this is it.” And I move on to the next one. Otherwise I would never move on.

  • Is this book part of a series? If so, how many installments do you have planned?

Another book about ants is not in the works. But similar books that combine fiction with fact are always swimming around in my creative brain… we shall see which one surfaces first.

  • Do you have any advice for aspiring authors?

To quote Winston Churchill, “Never, never, never give up.”

  • Why should everyone read your book?

To quote an Amazon reader:

“Who knew there was so much going on behind the scenes of our annual summer picnics? While we may gripe and complain about ant attacks targeting our watermelons and potato salads, until now, we have been blithely unaware of the battle below. Thank you, Aunt Haggis, for pulling back the corner of our picnic blankets to expose the secret underworld of the ant kingdom.

Targeted to 7 to 14 year-olds, The Checkered War is sure to captivate and delight its readers with intrigue and suspense. The Harvester, Carpenter, and Blood Red Slave Hunter ant colonies are at war with one another providing the perfect venue for readers to eavesdrop on their secret battle plans and strategy. Will the workers finish their battle assignments in time? Will the soldiers’ conditioning be enough to withstand the coming onslaught? Will the queen be captured? Will the ants in the nursery be carried away to safety in time of the invasion? Which colony will prevail?
The Checkered War is a memorable journey from beginning to end. The watercolor illustrations add not only beauty to the reading experience, but a tangible anchor to those readers who have a more visual learning style. The “Ant Fact” sections brought great joy to this educator’s heart as Aunt Haggis integrated the drama of storytelling with actual scientific knowledge. Bravo!”

  • If you could meet three authors, dead or alive, which authors would you choose?

Agatha Christie, David Baldacci, and Dr. Seuss.

  • What inspired you to write your book?

I became fascinated with ants when I bought an ant farm for one of my kids for Christmas. The idea that my child could view and study these tiny, industrious creatures was intriguing. And I would be teaching him something new and fun.

So I thought.

But the box remained unopened. For two years.

One day while cleaning out his closet, I noticed the ant farm smothered in a pile of clothes on the floor. Apparently, he still wasn’t fascinated, intrigued or mildly interested.

But I was.

So I took the box to my downstairs home office and set up the ant farm. Then with the coupon I found inside, I sent away for my live harvester ants and impatiently waited.

Finally, the ants arrived, and I was elated! I carefully poured the contents of the plastic vile into the ant farm, not letting a single ant escape, and voila! Instant ant farm! After a brief awakening to their new home, the ants set to work.

I watched fascinated as nature’s tiniest engineers dug tunnels, built roads, and erected bridges. They built room after room, segregating their living space, and never quit working! As I excitedly observed them day by day, I began to notice things they do that are just like humans, only better. They work together quietly, quickly and efficiently. Without training, classrooms, or the Internet, the ants figured out how to cooperate with each other, working as a unit to build a colony, find food, and take care of their young.

Simply stated: ants are pure inspiration.

And then I thought: “What if there was a book that readers assumed was about humans, but it was really about ants?”

  • Are you working on something at the moment? If so, can you tell us more about it?

I am currently writing a true adventure novel of a famous river runner who, against all odds, successfully conquered a first ascent of the violent Grijalva River in El Sumidero Canyon in southern Mexico in 1962. Faced with 16 miles of never-ending class five and class six rapids, he and his 15-man crew navigate the treacherous white water from sun up to sun down. With capsized boats, injured men, and weakened by dysentery, how did they get to the takeout? Why weren’t they killed, or why didn’t they abandoned the challenge, like those before them?

About The Checkered War

A feud is raging between three colonies. Although the Harvesters, Carpenters, and Blood Red Slave Hunters have been fighting since last year, this summer will secure a lasting victory for only one of them. This is the story of war and feast and … no, not famine… more feast!

And of Willy, our unlikely hero who has been adopted by the Harvesters. He is from the Black-Haired Garden colony and is nothing like them. Small and young, he knows nothing of war. How can he possibly help prepare for the big battle?

Willy learns that some species are parasites who never work, wandering around feeding off other colonies. Others are thieves and robbers, or killers and cannibals. And it’s always about war.

Does Willy merely try to survive, or does he figure out how to be a useful member of the colony? Can an insignificant like Willy help to win an unstoppable war?

At the end of each chapter, real science information called “Ant Facts” provide fascinating knowledge about the real lives of different species of ants.

And they explain why Willy is going to do what Willy is going to do!

Buy the book on Amazon.

About Aunt Haggis

Aunt Haggis is a published author, photographer, and outdoor enthusiast. She literally grew up on the river studying nature, rafting wild whitewater rapids, basking in the sun, and sleeping under a canopy of brilliant constellations. When she wasn’t looking up to examine the stars at night, she was looking down by day to investigate the most intriguing of creatures… ants. You will find her discoveries in The Checkered War.

Aunt Haggis has previously written seven full-length screenplays, one adult fiction novel, one illustrated novelette (which was a recipient of the Benjamin Franklin Award), a biography (of a famous river runner), and numerous magazine articles under a boring name she is required to use for business. The Checkered War is the debut of her first book for children.

Book Tours: Book Spotlight Raving About Rhys

Bubbly Callie Derbyshire loves her job as a carer, and can’t believe she’s finally landed herself a decent boyfriend – older man Tony – who’s lasted way longer than the usual disastrous three months. Tony’s exactly what she’s always dreamed of … or at least he would be if he ever took her out instead of just taking her to bed. And work would be perfect too if she wasn’t constantly in trouble with her boss, The She-Devil Denise.
When the new gardener, Mikey, discovers her in a rather compromising position at work, Callie knows that her days at Bay View Care Home could be numbered. Can she trust him not to tell Denise? If she’s issued with her marching orders, who’ll look out for her favourite client, Ruby, whose grandson, Rhys, seems to constantly let her down? What does Ruby know about Tony? And what is Denise hiding?
Surrounded by secrets and lies, is there anyone left who Callie can trust?

Purchase on Amazon UK

Author Bio

Jessica had never considered writing as a career until a former manager kept telling her that her business reports read more like stories and she should write a book. She loved writing but had no plot ideas. Then something happened to her that prompted the premise for her debut novel, Searching for Steven. She put fingers to keyboard and soon realised she had a trilogy and a novella!
She lives on the stunning North Yorkshire Coast – the inspiration for the settings in her books – with her husband, daughter, cat, Sprocker Spaniel, and an ever-growing collection of collectible teddy bears. Although if the dog has her way, the collection will be reduced to a pile of stuffing and chewed limbs!
Jessica tries to balance her time – usually unsuccessfully – between being an HR tutor and writing.

 

Social Media Links

Twitter:                                              @JessicaRedland

Facebook:                          https://www.facebook.com/JessicaRedlandWriter/

Website and blog:           www.jessicaredland.com