Book Review: Black Dawn by Mallory McCartney

Title: Black Dawn

Genre: YA/NA Fantasy

Author: Mallory McCartney

Age Group: New Adult

Rating: 4 stars

Purchase: Amazon

Review copy provided by Enchanted Book Promotions in exchange for an honest review.

The end of an Empire, the rise of a Queen

Emory Fae enjoys leading a quiet, normal life. That is until two mysterious, and handsome soldiers show up at her apartment, and the life she knew is instantly whisked away. Memphis Carter and Brokk Foster come from the magical and war ridden world of Kiero, and upon Emory’s arrival she will discover she is the long-lost heir to the Royal Line and is thrown into the Black Dawn Rebellion with a dynamic role to ignite the rebels and reclaim her throne.

With both men being darkly woven in her past Emory uncovers hidden secrets, a power held long dormant, and will soon realize there are worse things than supernatural humans, love, loss, betrayal, and a Mad King.

Some things are better left in the shadows

With the characters being older than in regular YA books, I would classify Black Dawn more as a new adult read – although it’s a clean read, so young adults can enjoy it too. New adults might find it easier to connect to the main characters, though.

Anyway, Black Dawn is the start of a brand new series, and it’s a promising start at that. Emory Fae leads a quiet, normal life – until two mysterious, handsome soldiers show up at her apartment. Memphis Carter and Brokk Foster come from a different world, the war ridden world of Kiero. Emory is the long lost heir of the royal line of Kiero, and is thus thrown right in the middle of the conflict, as soon as she arrives there, and urged to reclaim her throne.

The story is told in different perspectives, which could be a struggle, but it’s not the case here. If anything, it adds more to the story to be able to see it from differnet perspectives. The characters are three-dimensional, well-developed, and they act realistically, in particular Emory. I also liked Memphis. He had a complex, mysterious personality and it wasn’t always easy to figure out why he did what he did, which made him intriguing.

The pacing is fast, and there’s never quite time to catch a breath, which is pretty much how the whole experience must feel like for Emory, so to have the reader experience something similar works rather well.

The world building was pretty solid, the writing was fluent, and overall, I really enjoyed this book. I would recommend it to all fans of fantasy novels, and look forward to reading the second book in this series.

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