Book Review: Telos – From Theory to Practice by Ayelet Segal

Title: Telos – From Theory to Practice

Author: Ayelet Segal

Genre: Nonfiction, Mysticism, Self-Help

Age Group: Adult

Rating: 3 stars

Purchase: Amazon

Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Journey on a delicate frequency of love and harmony to Telos, city of light

The journey to Telos requires absolute faith and a true bond with the Sacred Heart. Only a delicate frequency of love and harmony will sustain peace in the Middle East. Our connection to each other and the common cause unified forces for the creation of Telos, the city of light. Over the years we have developed a full network of life below the surface of the earth, based on light, love, and vibrations of energy from the Supreme Creator.

Discover enlightening and true awakening beneath the earth’s surface!

We invite you on a journey of awakening, departure, and action. Hear about enlightenment in the Middle East and why we must enliven the light entities who are now awakening to the Lemurian energy of love that exists worldwide. I, Adama, High Priest of the light people in Telos, believe it is critically important to raise the vibrations across the globe. Area inhabitants, arise and realize that there is only one way to ascend. True awakening is through the heart!

In Telos – From Theory to Practice: A Voyage on the Way to Ascension, the reader learns about a journey of awakening, of departure and actoin through Adama, High Priest of the light people in Telos. The goal is peace in the Middle East, maybe even across the globe, which will be accomplished through people’s connections with one another. A network has been established below the surface of the earth based on light, love and energy vibrations, and this will awaken a worldwide energy bringing love and peace and awakening to all.

I’m not much of a believer. I’m interested in religions and belief systems, but I’m not particularly convinced of anything, not even the existence of a positive, worldwide energy–although I sure realize we could use some of that. I usually don’t mind spirituality books, but this book was a little too far-stretched for me to truly enjoy. While the message in its core was pure, when I hear terms like “high priest” and so on, I often cringe, because I don’t believe that, in terms of religion and spirituality in particular, one person could stand higher than another.

The values the book promotes are worthy of being promoted, though, so I’m giving points for that. The writing isn’t bad either. It just wasn’t for me, and I cringed more often than I would’ve wanted to.

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