Book Review From Compton to Congress by Walter Tucker III

Title: From Compton to Congress: His Grace for my Race
Author: Walter Tucker III
Genre: Nonfiction Memoir
Rating: 4,5 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by Enchanted Book Promotions in exchange for an honest review.

From Compton to Congress reveals shocking criminal charges, based on an FBI Sting, that send Congressman Walter R. Tucker III reeling, and changes his life forever. Against the great odds of overcoming the tough streets of Compton, young Tucker fulfills his goals of becoming valedictorian of Compton High School, graduate of USC with honors, graduate of Georgetown Law School, passing the California State Bar, and filling his father’s vacant seat as Mayor of Compton—all by age 33. During his meteoric rise in the political arena, at age 35 he becomes the youngest African-American from California to be elected to a U.S. congressional seat. However, the U.S. Attorney’s federal indictment against him shocks the nation. Tucker’s choice to fight the charges against him thrusts him into a criminal trial that tests the condition of his human spirit and provokes us to reflect on every man’s plight versus every man’s fight.

Let me start by saying that I was deeply moved by Walter R. Tucker III’s story, in From Compton to Congress. The odds are against him as he pursues his dreams: first of becoming valedictorian in his high school, then graduating USC, then Law School, passing the bar, and eventually becoming mayor of Compton, the town he grew up. As he rises lightning-bolt fast in the political arena, he becomes the youngest African-American from California to be elected to an US congressional seat by the age of 35.

However, his dreams are shattered when a federal indictment is launched against him. Tucker decides to fight back, and the charges are brought to trial…which might be Walter R. Tucker’s most difficult battle yet.

It was inspiring to read how, even early on in his life, Tucker always fought on, no matter how tough the struggles, no matter how immense the challenges, and how he held on to that fighting spirit despite everything. The book brings to light some of the darker sides of politics, and of the criminal justice system.

This book was a thrilling, inspiring rollercoaster ride that made me feel very sympathetic toward Walter R. Tucker III and his family. An outstanding, intriguing read.

Book Tours: Starter Day Party From Compton to Congress

I’m hosting the starter day party today for the book tour for nonfiction memoir “From Compton to Congress”. The tour runs from January 8 to January 22.

Tour Schedule

January 8th: Starter Day Party @ I Heart Reading

January 8th: Promo Post @ Nesie’s Place

January 11th: Promo Post @ Stormy Night Reviewing

January 12th: Promo Post @ Author C.A. Milson’s Blog

January 13th: Promo Post @ T’s Stuff

January 15th: Author Interview @ The Single Librarian

January 17th: Book Review @ I Heart Reading

January 19th: Book Excerpt @ Bookish Madness

January 20th: Promo Post @ Editor Charlene’s Blog

January 22nd: Book Excerpt @ Nesie’s Place

About the Book

Title: From Compton to Congress: His Grace for my Race

Author: Walter Tucker III

Genre: Nonfiction Memoir

From Compton to Congress reveals shocking criminal charges, based on an FBI Sting, that send Congressman Walter R. Tucker III reeling, and changes his life forever. Against the great odds of overcoming the tough streets of Compton, young Tucker fulfills his goals of becoming valedictorian of Compton High School, graduate of USC with honors, graduate of Georgetown Law School, passing the California State Bar, and filling his father’s vacant seat as Mayor of Compton—all by age 33. During his meteoric rise in the political arena, at age 35 he becomes the youngest African-American from California to be elected to a U.S. congressional seat. However, the U.S. Attorney’s federal indictment against him shocks the nation. Tucker’s choice to fight the charges against him thrusts him into a criminal trial that tests the condition of his human spirit and provokes us to reflect on every man’s plight versus every man’s fight.

Author Bio

Walter R. Tucker, III is a native of Compton, California. He graduated Valedictorian of Compton High School in 1974. After graduating from high school, Walter studied Politics at Princeton University for two years. After receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from U.S.C. in 1978, and his Juris Doctor from Georgetown Law School in 1981, Walter worked as a Los Angeles County Deputy District Attorney, established his own law firm, served as Mayor of Compton, and was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1993 – all by age 35. Walter R. Tucker, III is still the youngest African American to ever to be elected to the U.S. Congress from the State of California. In 2003, Walter became a pastor of a church in Chicago. In 2012, Walter and his wife, Robin Tucker, returned to Los Angeles and founded Truth and Love Christian Church, located in Carson, California. The church currently has over 300 members and 40 ministries in operation. Walter and Robin have been happily married for 30 years. They are the proud parents of Walter, IV, and Autumn and have one son-in-law, Spencer Rodney Sr., and one wonderful grandchild, Spencer Rodney, Jr. Walter enjoys morning walks on the beach and candlelight dinners with Robin.

Links

Amazon

Website

Goodreads

Guest Post A Few Minor Adjustments

I’m hosting a guest post today by Cherie Kephart, author of “A Few Minor Adjustments”. Welcome to my blog, and thanks for taking the time to write a guest post for on here.

Healing Through Writing MemoirCherie Kephart

How do you heal through writing memoir? Writing a memoir is a restorative and soulful experience. By crafting a memoir, we learn how our experiences have shaped us, and we make a conscious choice to share this found wisdom with our readers. Memoir writing then becomes a healing experience that is a shared discovery.

Most memoirists, at one time or another, feel frozen, attempting to write about the deepest and most sacred parts of their lives. How do they deal with these foreboding and overwhelming feelings?

There is not one way to write a memoir, or one way to heal. There are multiple paths. Discovering what works best for you is important. In my case, I felt paralyzed while creating the beginning scenes in my memoir that dealt with the two times I almost died. Tears flowed instead of words. It felt too personal, and it was obvious I still had scars from those events. I struggled for months while the blank page haunted me. But I didn’t give up. Instead, I went deep within and asked for answers. One morning while meditating, I had the inspiration to write under a pseudonym: Maya. It was like a new open road I had just discovered. The streams pouring out of me were no longer tears, they were words. I could write about Maya, and it felt safe. I felt lighter, more connected to the story, and proud to help “Maya” with her journey.

But I didn’t keep the name Maya.

I reached a point where I was able to let go of the fear of speaking my truth, and embraced that people would read my story, my mistakes, my pain, and my struggles. It became a defining moment in my writing career, and life. Could I have started writing with my real name? No. I needed Maya to help me graduate to that space of comfort with my story and the gifts I was giving to myself and eventually to the world.

So what’s the bigger picture to writing a memoir? It’s not about names. Each writer has to choose whether a pseudonym is right for her or not. For me, it was a ladder to reach new heights. The essence of the story is what matters. Memoirs are about exposing both the dark and light of our lives, creating a profound conversation connecting our humanity.

We heal when we write memoir by owning our experiences and releasing them, not by being attached to our stories. It’s a sensitive arena, and sometimes difficult to navigate. Fundamentally, it’s about relinquishing the power your story has over you. By learning to let go of the story that is holding you back, you can craft the story you were meant to tell.

Through the craft of writing memoir, we evolve in our journey beyond what existed when we first embarked on this worthy, literary endeavor. I encourage you to enter the unwritten, write from a healing vantage point, healing for you, and for the world. It will be a transformative experience. It has been for me!

 

Press Release

San Diego Author Cherie Kephart

Empowers Those with Undiagnosed Illness in

Inspirational Memoir, A Few Minor Adjustments

Carlsbad, CA – San Diego author Cherie Kephart announces the release of her inspirational memoir, A Few Minor Adjustments (ISBN 978-1947127-01-2).  A Few Minor Adjustments won the Autobiography: Female Inspirational/Motivational category of the 2017 Bookvana Awards and the Best Unpublished Memoir Award at the 2017 San Diego Book Awards. It was also featured in the 2017 San Diego Annual Memoir Showcase and has been performed onstage at the Horton Grand Theater.

Cherie Kephart, a young woman who longed for adventure, traveled the world from the remote villages of Central Africa to the majestic coastlines of New Zealand until a mysterious illness thrust her to the precipice of death. The persistent health challenges led to years of suffering, during which her symptoms time and again were undiagnosed by well-meaning medical doctors and healers who were sometimes competent, sometimes careless, sometimes absurd, and always baffled. The anguish, the uncertainty, and the relentless pain would have caused many people to simply give up and end their lives—and Kephart came close.

Told with brutal honesty, astonishing wit, and a haunting vulnerability, A Few Minor Adjustments is an unforgettable memoir that will move readers with its fiercely inspirational account of one woman’s incredible journey to find life-saving answers. In the end, she finds much more than a diagnosis.

“I wrote this book to help others who are also on a journey of healing,” said Kephart. “Oftentimes people like me, who have undiagnosed illnesses, go years without help and without hope of ever finding a cure. We feel like outcasts, even within the sick community. I often felt lost, alone, and afraid, never knowing if I would ever find a diagnosis or heal. It’s frightening. I want people to know that if they are open and believe, they can heal in ways they never imagined possible, even without a clear diagnosis.”

A writer, editor, and poet, Cherie Kephart holds an M.A. in Medical and Cultural Anthropology, and has worked for many years as a scientific and technical writer. Her memoir, A Few Minor Adjustments, won the Autobiography: Female Inspirational/Motivational category of the 2017 Bookvana Awards and the Best Unpublished Memoir Award at the 2017 San Diego Book Awards. It was also featured in the 2017 San Diego Annual Memoir Showcase and has been performed onstage at the Horton Grand Theater. Kephart’s essays, stories, and poems have been featured in The San Diego Writers Ink Anthology, The San Diego Poetry Annual, the Oceanside Literary Art Walk, the Wild Lemon Project, and the Magee Park Poets Anthology. Kephart resides in San Diego and has been celebrated for her holistic approach to healing and her willingness to examine her life lessons in her writing.

For more information on the author or A Few Minor Adjustments, please visit www.CherieKephart.com.

For further information, please contact:

Paula Margulies Communications

8145 Borzoi Way

San Diego, CA 92129

858-538-2047

paula@paulamargulies.com

www.paulamargulies.com

Book Review: A Girl Called Renee by Ruth Uzrad

Title: A Girl Called Renee
Author: Ruth Uzrad
Genre: Thriller
Rating: 5 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Terrified after her father’s arrest by the Nazis, Ruth flees to Belgium.

This is the unbelievable autobiographical story of Ruth Uzrad, a Jewish teenager whose life was turned upside down by the Nazi regime. After her father was arrested one night from their Berlin apartment by the Gestapo, Ruth’s mother sends 13 year-old Ruth and her two younger sisters out on their escape route across Europe by train to the safety of Belgium.

But then the Nazis also reach Belgium, driving Ruth into the French Jewish underground…

Later, when the Nazis conquer Belgium, Ruth and one of her sisters escape to France, leaving the youngest sister behind to be taken in by a Belgian foster family. Later, Ruth joins the Jewish underground movement in France and takes on a false identity and a new name, Renee. As an underground fighter, she participates in special operations aimed at rescuing Jews in danger. When the German police set out to arrest her, she manages to cross the border into Spain and eventually makes her way to Israel, where she makes her home and spends the rest of her life.

I was so excited to start reading A Girl Called Renee because part of the book takes place in Belgium, the country where I live. The story certainly didn’t dissapoint, and I was really impressed by Ruth, and how strong she stayed in the face of so much evil.

So, first of all, this is an autobiographical book, meaning that the events happening in the book, actually happened. Although while you’re reading it, it’s hard to believe so much horror can actually be true, but we all know how horrible and devastating world war II was for so many people. Anyway, Ruth Uzrad was a Jewish teenager back then, and her father got arrested in Berlin by the Gestapo. Scared of what would happen to their family, Ruth’s mother sent 13-year-old Ruth and two young sisters away from Germany, and to the safety of Belgium.

Yet, the unthinkable happens, and the Nazis conquer Belgium. Ruth and one of her sisters manage to escape to France, where Ruth joins an underground movement and takes on a false identity and name – Renee. As an underground fighter, she participates in several operations to save endangered Jews. When the Gestapo are on her tracks, she flees to Spain and eventually to Israel.

This story is heartbreaking, often brought me to tears, but it’s also very inspiring. It shows strength and courage, it shows how people can survive the unimaginable, and even try to help others when the world seems to have sunken into chaos and despair. It shows hope, that lives on when everything else has left already. It shows humanity’s triumph over evil. If I read Ruth’s biography correctly, she has since passed away, and I’m very sorry to hear that, and give my condolences to her family. Reading this book, Ruth was truly an amazing person, the kind of person who makes this world a better place.

 

Book Review: Two Princes and a Queen

Title: Two Princes and a Queen
Author: Shmuel David
Genre: Memoirs, Historical
Rating: 4 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Imagine having to flee for your life from the Nazis on a rundown river-boat!

Hanne is the teenaged son of a well-off Jewish family living a comfortable, sheltered life in Yugoslavia. In the face of persecution against Jews, Hanne and his parents joins a harrowing voyage down the Danube River, eventually meant to reach pre-State Israel. The passengers aboard the three creaking river-boats are constantly torn between hope and despair in their attempt to reach safety.

A dying father implores his son to uncover the truth about his past

On his death-bed, Hanne implores his son, Alan, to find out what became of his first love, Inge, whom he was forced to leave under tragic circumstances during the river journey. Alan becomes inexorably drawn to delving into the past. He pores over his father’s journals as well as other survivor diaries and letters, together with recorded interviews with Erica, the one survivor left in NYC, and learns the bitter truth contained in Inge’s death camp diary.

A devoted son discover a little-know story that must be shared

Bit by bit, Alan uncovers the horrendous story of the young lovers’ harrowing voyage down the Danube River along with Hundreds of other jews attempting to flee the Nazis for Israel in a historic fiasco that came to be called the Kladovo-Sabac Affair. While focusing on a touching love story, this historical novel also tells the ill-fated, real-life stories of other people who shaped the journey.

In Two Princes and a Queen, Shmuel David creates a touching love story about Hanne and Inge, two young lovers during the Holocaust who are forced to flee from prosecution. Hanne and his parents are forced on a voyage down the Danube River, meant to reach Israel, but the journey is far from easy. Meanwhile, Hanne falls in love with Inge, but is then forced to leave her under tragic circumstances during their journey across the river.

Years later, on his deathbed, Hanne implores his son, Alan, to uncover what happened to Inge all those years back. Alan, in the mean time, grows deeply involved in his father’s story, and the tragedy he went through. Set during some of history’s darkest times, the book sketches the characters and plot well, and creates an astonishing plot that moves swiftly yet touches deeply.

Fans of historical fiction set during the Holocaust should pick up this book and give it a shot.

 

Book Review: Did I Ever Thank You, Sister?

Title: Did I Ever Thank You Sister?
Author: Sal Di Leo
Genre: Nonfiction
Rating: 4,5 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by Enchanted Book Promotions in exchange for an honest review.

Sal Di Leo returns after 30 years to the Catholic orphanage outside Chicago that he and his siblings called home in 1963. This is the beginning of a journey of discovery and remembrance as Sal is forced to reconstruct his life as it really happened, including some of his most difficult years at Boys Town in Nebraska. As an adult, Sal tried to rise above his turbulent past in an aggressive quest for power and money. Successes soon led to failures. Eventually, a wise friend convinces Sal to go back to his roots and look for the good experiences and valuable lessons he learned as a nine-year-old orphan.

Did I Ever Thank You, Sister? is a heartwarming story of human triumph, of surviving against all odds. It’s a journey of self-discovery and remembrance. Sal Di Leo grew up in an orphanage outside Chicago, and had a troubled childhood that led him to make some wrong choices as an adult. His childhood scars put him on an aggressive quest for power and money as an adult, and this all soon led to failures, until a friend convinced him to go back to his roots, and the life lessons he learned despite his struggles as a child.

The book often brought me to tears because of how many challenges Sal and his siblings had to face in their youth. Reading about Sal’s dreams, tribulations, and how he grew and changed as a person was very inspiring.

Bewaren

Book Tours: Starter Day Party Did I Ever Thank You, Sister?

Today I’m hosting the starter day party for the book tour for nonfiction “Did I Ever Thank You, Sister?” The tour runs from September 19 to October 19. Stay tuned for my review during the tour!

Tour Schedule

September 19th: Starter Day Party @ I Heart Reading

September 20th: Promo Post @ I’m an Eclectic Reader

September 21st: Promo Post @ Author C.A. Milson’s Blog

September 23rd: Promo Post @ Bookish Madness

September 25th: Book Excerpt @ Silver Dagger Scriptorium

September 27th: Author Interview @ Majanka’s Blog

September 29th: Book Excerpt @ Indy Book Fairy

October 1st: Guest Post @ Editor Charlene’s Blog

October 3rd: Book Review @ I Heart Reading

October 5th: Author Interview @ The Single Librarian

October 7th: Book Excerpt @ The Resistance

October 9th: Book Review @ Bedazzled Reading

October 11th: Guest Post @ Mythical Books

October 13th: Book Excerpt @ Just Books

October 13th: Promo Post @ The Bookworm Lodge

October 15th: Book Excerpt @ Lisa Queen of Random

October 17th: Book Review @ Books are Forever

October 19th: Book Excerpt @ The Book Daily

 

About the Book

Title: Did I Ever Thank You Sister?

Author: Sal Di Leo

Genre: Nonfiction

Sal Di Leo returns after 30 years to the Catholic orphanage outside Chicago that he and his siblings called home in 1963. This is the beginning of a journey of discovery and remembrance as Sal is forced to reconstruct his life as it really happened, including some of his most difficult years at Boys Town in Nebraska. As an adult, Sal tried to rise above his turbulent past in an aggressive quest for power and money. Successes soon led to failures. Eventually, a wise friend convinces Sal to go back to his roots and look for the good experiences and valuable lessons he learned as a nine-year-old orphan.

Author Bio

An entrepreneur who has successfully tackled many challenges in business and in life, Sal volunteers much of his time serving those in need. With his family, he founded St. Francis Lodge, a free retreat center where nuns, priests and others can reflect and rest to enhance their lives and work. The State Fish Art contest, which he started in Minnesota to help kids learn about conservation through art, is now offered in all 50 states and 12 countries. Sal has been actively involved with Rotary and the Lions Club, and he has spoken to service clubs around the United States about his life and the importance of gratitude. His self-published memoir, Did I Ever Thank You, Sister?, rooted in his childhood experiences in a Catholic orphanage, is available worldwide. The proud father of two adult daughters who have successfully left the nest, Sal has been married to his lovely wife Beth for more than 30 years. A longtime resident of Minneapolis, he is a 1977 graduate of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

Links

Goodreads

Amazon

Website: http://www.saldileo.com/

Bewaren

Book Review: The Hooligans of Kandahar by Joseph Kassabian

Title: The Hooligans of Kandahar
Author: Joseph Kassabian
Genre: Nonfiction, War Memoir
Age Group: Adult
Rating: 4,5 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by Enchanted Book Promotions in exchange for an honest review.

During the peak years of the Afghanistan War, a group of soldiers is dropped by helicopter into the remote mountains outside of Kandahar City. Mismanaged and overlooked by command, how they survive is largely up to them. In the birthplace of the Taliban, some men lose their sanity, others their humanity. They are The Hooligans.

Written in the months and years following his deployment, Joseph Kassabian recounts his time in the isolated and dangerous country of Afghanistan. Pulling no punches, The Hooligans of Kandahar is a sobering, saddening, and often sarcastic first-hand account of America’s War on Terror.

In The Hooligans of Kandahar, author Joseph Kassabian talks about his time as a soldier during the war in Afghanistan. A group of soldiers is dropped by a helicopter into the remote mountains outside of Kandahar City. Overlooked by command, and mismanaged, their survival is entirely up to them. Some lose their sanity, some their humanity, but no one leaves unscathed.

The story isn’t sensationalized, nothing like Rambo or half a dozen other action movies. It feels real and raw, and as such, holds a lot more merit. It talks about struggles, not just to survive, but to hang on to the things that make us human. It talks about finding hope when hope is lost, about being strong in the face of perils, about not giving up.

Despite the often grim subject matter, the book still manages to be humorous and witty at times, and it’s an interesting experience to read through this book. Wrong and right, good and evil, books like this one put all of that in perspective. An intriguing rollercoaster of a book that visits almost the entire emotional spectrum.

Boook Review: Courage and Grace by Yoseph Komen

Title: Courage and Grace
Author: Yoseph Komen
Genre: Historical, Memoir, Nonfiction
Age Group: Adult
Rating: 4,5 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

A family’s unbelievable survival in the face of the Holocaust

Yoseph and Itzhak Komem are two young Jewish brothers hiding under fake Catholic identities in the Aryan side of a Polish town during the Holocaust. Their fascinating testimonies are brought together with those of their deaf father, their mother, and others, to convey their life stories and their unbelievable escape from the Nazis.

You’ll read this amazing literary, historical, and biographical document with bated breath

The novel weaves an unbelievable mix of everyday and nightmarish reality, between the ghetto and outside of it, colorfully portraying the struggle to survive on the rear lines of a war between the Wehrmacht and the Red Army. The memories conclude with the period of life after liberation: in the Polish People’s Republic, in an orphanage in France, in a boarding school in England, and in the Land of Israel.

A drama of tragedy and rescue, dare, courage, and grace

Courage and Grace offers a unique memoir of the Second World War, written in the form of a polyphony— a chorus of voices that reverberate with each other, highlighting their differences in experience and points of view. The author recreates a gripping and suspenseful mosaic of daring escapes, concealments, and acts of valor, portraying the struggle for survival in the face of a living nightmare.

Courage and Grace tells the story of Yoseph and Itzhak Komen, two young Jewish brothers hiding under fake Catholic identities in the Aryan side of a Polish town during the Holocaust. This book tells their fascinating testimonies, but also the true accounts of their parents and others who had to hide from the Nazis. And also life after the Liberation: in an orphanage, in a boarding school, and eventually settling down in Israel.

This is an unique memoir, deeply touching, moving, thought-provoking, told by various different voices who together wave an intriguing tale of courage and grace, of survival in the face of perilous odds, of never giving up. Each time I read a book about the Holocaust, my heart breaks, seeing so much innocence shattered, so much hatred and despair. Yet, these books also give me hope and courage, because humanity is strong, and humans don’t break easily, and despite going through horrors, people manage to find their humanity again.

This book is strong and powerful, and reading about the young boys’ struggle to survive was heartbreaking. Despite that, it deserves to be read and reflected upon, so we remember the atrocities of war and continue fighting for a better world, a peaceful world, where fights are settled with diplomacy and compromises rather than taking up arms.

Book Review: I Love You My Child, I’m Abandoning You

Title: I Love You My Child, I’m Abandoning You
Author: Ariela Palacz
Genre: Hisotrical Fiction
Age Group: Adult
Rating: 4,5 stars
Purchase: Amazon
Review copy provided by Enchanted Book Promotions in exchange for an honest review.

An exciting human documentary taking place in France during the Holocaust

Little Paulette is an excellent pupil, surrounded by a loving family. But one day she is suddenly forced to confront the cruel reality of the Holocaust, together with the rest of French Jewry. Paulette is forced to separate from her family, and as a result, abandoned by her father. But despite her difficult and shocking life experiences, she remains naïve and optimistic, holding on to her thirst for life even in the darkest hours.

An authentic and moving life story

I Love You My Child, I’m Abandoning You is an exciting human documentary, taking place in France during the Holocaust. It honors the memory of the French Jews who perished in the Second World War, while simultaneously giving voice the persistent will to live, and the strength and bravery that characterize those who survived and gave rise to the future generations of the Jewish people.

An existential odyssey that puts a spotlight on the human need and right to belong

Ariela Palacz shares her life story through the character of little Paulette Szenker, sensitively weaving past and present into an authentic and moving journey that shifts between WWII France and contemporary Jerusalem. A story about the human spirit and the thirst for a family, a tradition, and a nation, that will touch your heart.

I Love You My Child, I’m Abandoning You is a novel by Ariela Palacz that is set during the Holocaust, in France. Paulette is an excellent pupil surrounded by a loving family. But when the cruel reality of the Holocaust catches up with her and her reltives, she’s forced to seperate from her family, and abandoned by her father. While going through some life-altering experiences, Paulette stays naïve and optimistic, even at the darkest of times.

This book is heartbreaking. Most of the books about the Holocaust are, but this one in particular made me extremely sad and angry. The pacing was a little slow, but that suited the book. The story took time to develop, but the reader needs that time to get to know Paulette and her ordinary life, before the horrible seperation and before tragedy begins.

That the book is based on true events makes it all the more horrible, and makes it an even more emotional read. Don’t expect a happy story.